Grow both types of tarragon the same way, in full sun in very well drained—even dry—soil. Put the seeds on top of the potting soil and gently push them into the soil to provide good contact. Disclosure. Mist them with a water bottle and cover with a plastic lid or a sheet of glass. Required fields are marked *. Growing Tarragon. The advantage of growing in pots is that the plant can be moved into the shelter of a cool greenhouse in the winter. Alternatively, for all year round supply, sow indoors in pots. You must purchase the plants or take an established plant from a friend’s garden. Russian Tarragon actually prefers poor soils and happily tolerates drought and neglect. Growing Tarragon, Russian Herb Seed. Tarragon may not be the most attractive herb, but it's flavorsome, easy to grow, hardy and drought-resistant. The substrate doesn’t even need to be very rich (too much nitrogen weakens the leaves’ taste). This the easiest type of tarragon to grow. I am currently developing my own range of products. Planting. Check on them every day to see if they have developed sprouts. Hardy. Like mint, tarragon spreads by underground runners, but is much less vigorous than mint and unlikely to be a problem. Easy to grow variety producing an abundance of leaves great for flavouring vinegars, pickles and sauces. Germination rate is low so plan on placing four seeds per pot. A herb, probably most famous for it's inclusion in Hollandaise and Béarnaise Sauce. You want your cuttings to be 3-6 inches long. JAVASCRIPT IS DISABLED. Days to Maturity: Perennial Hardiness Zone: 4-9 Planting Depth: 1/4” Plant Spacing: 18-24” Growth Habit: Upright Soil Preference: Loamy and well-drained Temp Preference: Warm Light Preference: Full sun Color: Green leaves with umbel-shaped white flowers Flavor: Slight anise, pepper and licorice Sowing and Growing It prefers poor soil and can cope with not enough water and neglect. Just an FYI, in the seed catalog, you might see the word, tarragon, and think it is french tarragon. When used in cooking add 3 to 4 times as much as when using French tarragon. Place the leaves in a mason jar or any decorative jar with a tight lid. This the easiest type of tarragon to grow. Russian Tarragon is an herb used in soups and as a garnish, and can be grown in your own herb garden. See above – tarragon does grow quite tall (30 to 60 cm) but if you grow them indoors using artificiall light you will be able to harvest them for a longer period. Artemisia dracunculoides Russian. A herb, probably most famous for it's inclusion in Hollandaise and Béarnaise Sauce. And be forewarned: Russian tarragon can become invasive. Remove the leaves with a strainer and leave the vinegar in the jar. Tarragon can be grown in pots but you’ll need a fairly large one as it reaches 120cm high. You can’t grow French tarragon from seeds. Using a rolling pin gently roll the leaves to release the essential oils. Of all the tarragon varieties this is easiest to grow but weaker in flavour. Russian tarragon has slightly wider leaves and tends to grow much larger over time. Keep the young tarragon plants pinched back to promote bushiness and to postpone flowering. Once the seedlings appear, remove the plastic. Your email address will not be published. Growing On: When the seedlings are strong enough to handle they can be transplanted into bigger pots or trays. Learn how to grow Russian Tarragon in your herb garden in this free video. But for cooking purposes, you cannot beat the flavor of French tarragon. Here’s how to grow tarragon in your herb garden! French tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus var. Tarragon Plant - Russian Tarragon. Russian tarragon is much more bitter and Mexican tarragon is much stronger. Start seeds indoors in late spring before your last expected frost date. 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Don’t bother, unless you want a pretty plant in the garden, Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Supplied as a pot grown plant grown in a 7cm pot. Russian tarragon can easily be mistaken for French, but Russian tarragon is coarser and less flavorful than French tarragon. Russian tarragon is easy to grow, it can be grown from seed and is a very hardy and fast growing plant. It can grow up to five feet tall. Source: apple_pathways. Which is why I started the Chef's Gardener website. Germination can take up to 2 weeks. If they have little to no taste, it’s Russian tarragon. It isn’t. Russian tarragon isn't so fussy, but still doesn't like wet soil. Russian tarragon plant has attractive, long, narrow, bright green leaves. If using russian tarragon then make sure it’s fresh; And add 3 to 4 times as much as when using French tarragon. Indoor Planting: Sprinkle seeds thinly on the surface of trays of moist compost and cover lightly, be careful not to over-water. Growing Tarragon. Learn how to grow Russian Tarragon in your herb garden in this free video. Group & quantity discounts. This means if you click on the link, visit Amazon and purchase the item, I will earn some money at no extra cost to you. Russian tarragon is great for on the patio but not as an ingredient. Harden off and plant outside in full sun and loamy, well-drained soil. Russian tarragon is very hardy and once it’s established it won’t need much water. You must purchase the plants or take an established plant from a friend’s garden. You want to lay them horizontally in little trenches that are 1/2 inch deep.